PNP (Police) websites under hacker attacks since hostage crisis

After the recent hostage crisis in Manila went badly wrong the Directorate for Information and Communications Technology Management (DICTM) of the Philippine National Police has placed itself on high alert as since the tragedy www.pnp.gov.ph was shut down and is part of a series of ongoing attacks on PNP websites. Chief Inspector Felizardo Eubra of the Web Services and Cyber Technology Division (anti-hacking unit of DICTM) has expressed concern over the attacks and his team are currently trying to source the origins of the hackers.

Just after the end of the hostage crisis a barrage of hate emails were received by the PNP through feedback@pnp.gov.ph followed by email threats to deface and shutdown all PNP websites.

The majority of emails were received from Hong Kong an official from DICTM  told a local newspaper.

Examples of emails received :-

  • Sent by a certain Diu Kau Lee said the Philippine police force is “rubbish” and branded the country as a “nation of slaves.”
  • Another e-mail, also sent from Hong Kong, chided the Manila Police for taking 30 minutes to break into the bus with a 10-pound hammer
  • Another e-mail, meanwhile, questioned the way the Manila Police handled the brother of the hostage-taker. The e-mail also asked President Aquino to relieve officials of the Manila Police over the incident.
  • The thing with emails though to be honest people are always 10ft tall online and Tom thumb in real life.. The fact of the matter is its given an easy way to vent without actually having to read a reply or deal with the people you just sent abuse to. The emails above are pretty tame compared to some of the junk I receive every now and again. The hacking side on the other hand is something they should encourage assistance with Hong Kong Police to deal with if found to source from there. The emails can simply be deleted and forgotten as they are just rants of frustrated and angry people.. I bet a lot of call centres get worse on a daily basis on the end of a phone line.